Intervening in a Knife Fight

Okay, here is a good comment from a reader. Here was the situation, and the question:

good timing…

a friend of mine was recently riding Marta to the airport obviously unarmed and with his luggage. at one of the stops he heard a woman scream and some guy (purse snatcher) gets on his train. majority of people unass the AO except for the purse snatcher, bystander, my friend and a lil ole lady.

the bystander pulls a knife & the purse snatcher has his knife out…

doors close…

the round begins

my friend watches these two guys slice and dice until the next stop. maybe 5mins?

question for the masses…what do you do? assist or do nothing?

good timing…

a friend of mine was recently riding Marta to the airport obviously unarmed and with his luggage. at one of the stops he heard a woman scream and some guy (purse snatcher) gets on his train. majority of people unass the AO except for the purse snatcher, bystander, my friend and a lil ole lady.

the bystander pulls a knife & the purse snatcher has his knife out…

doors close…

the round begins

my friend watches these two guys slice and dice until the next stop. maybe 5mins?

question for the masses…what do you do? assist or do nothing?

 

Here is my response.  Do not intervene.  You have no backup in this situation.  If you are headed to the airport by way of public transportation, you have no weapons on you.  If you are headed to a different location, maybe it is a different story.  If you are carrying a concealed firearm, you can choose to intervene in some way, but otherwise you are putting yourself into a very explosive situation that can be very, very bad for you and/or orther parties involved.  You have no idea how these guys will react if you jump into the fray.  The best thing you can do is to take a protective position for you and the little old lady.  Can you see an emergency call button on the train?  Again, until you can exit the premises, the best thing for you to do at this point is to take a protective position with the elderly woman.  If the climate changes and one of the two shifts aggression towards you–then you have to make a different decision!

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Questions Regarding Use of Force

Questions about use of force come up so often, which is why I find myself talking about it so much.  Last night, we were drilling some knife disarms in the Kali class and I made a short point about stabbing someone after a disarm.  I see a lot of students immediately following up with a deadly force maneuver using the weapon as soon as they acquire it.  The response to my cautionary comment was a common one: this guy just threatened me with a weapon and I am going to stab him.  I’ll grant you that your attacker does not give one hoot in Hell about your rights when he pulls a weapon on you.  I’ll grant you that the art often includes a very aggressive follow-up that would be appropriate for war.  Nevertheless, I must ask some serious questions that must be framed within the proper context: outside of a war zone or hostile territory.  I ask them because I want you to think about them from the vantage point of those whose duty it is to enforce the law of the land.

 

What would a reasonable person do? 

What does your local law say about self-defense?  Better yet, how is it interpreted—have you spoken with an attorney?  What force are you authorized to use after you have disarmed an assailant and/or gained the advantage?

What is the thought process for any follow-up?  Have you considered your options with the acquisition of an assailant’s edged weapon: stab him, slash him, throw down the weapon, run, strike him, hold him at knifepoint and call the authorities, etc.   

If you choose to use force after a disarm, shouldn’t you be able to articulate why?  Are the powers that be going to be interested in those kinds of details?

When might it be appropriate to stab him, i.e. use deadly force?

Blog Post on Punching Speed

I posted a video the other day from Crazy Monkey on wrapping the hands for sparring and/or bag work.  Here is an interesting blog post on increasing punching speed.  It’s a nice, progressive approach that makes a lot of sense.  Good information.  Funny name.  🙂

http://crazymonkeydefense.com/blogs/?p=145

Do or Die

I was reading an interesting blog post by Brian Willis on use of force, which is a topic I would like to get into in more depth on another post.  Brian is specifically talking about the subject as it relates to police officers.  He says that all too often, when the topic comes up in classes, people say that they will do whatever is necessary to win a fight, but are pretty vague about what that means to them.  The discussion usually ends at that point.  Brian says we need to probe further and think through specifics, as opposed to leaving it all to be figured out at the moment.  I am certain there are a lot of people, officers and civilians, who have not answered the serious question about deadly force.  Am I willing to take a human life to save my own life or the lives of others?  Brian lists some interesting examples of what one might consider doing in a battle royale.  He also makes a great point about officers who have improvised successfully to save lives simply because they had considered certain tactics and methods prior to an event.  They used the power of imagination and it enlightened them to possibilities.  The great Albert Einstein said that imagination “will take you everywhere.”  Let imagination become part of your training.  Whether through “reality” and “experience” or through mind play, options and possibilities are still borne of the mind.  In any case, I feel myself about to go off on some long tangent about the fluid concept of reality and another article about lethal force encounters.  No need for that today, but check out Brian’s post!

http://excellenceintraining.typepad.com/excellence_in_training/2009/12/what-ever-it-takes.html

John Whitman Video Clip

Here is a fun video clip of the John Whitman gun and knife seminar we attended a few weeks ago.  We all particularly enjoyed him doing the first maneuver you will see in the clip.  It’s probably a good thing he did not tell Richard exactly what he was going to do. . .

Wrapping the Hands

Honestly, this is one of the best and easiest explanations of wrapping the hands I have ever seen. A lot of people use either the MMA gloves or fast wraps, but like he says, you can use the traditional wraps to mold to your particular hand size and shape. At the end of the video, he wraps one hand in 30 seconds. I love the name of this company, too: Crazy Monkey Defense. That cracks me up.

http://www.youtube.com/user/CrazyMonkeyDefense#p/c/91ED1751EBD2533D

EZine Articles

Here are links to several of our articles that we have published on eZine.  Peruse them and share with others!

Your Agoge: http://ezinearticles.com/?Your-Agoge&id=799387
 
The Beat Model: http://ezinearticles.com/?The-BEAT-Model&id=804494
 
Why Be Fit: http://ezinearticles.com/?Why-Be-Fit?&id=809482
 
The Gutterfighting Way: http://ezinearticles.com/?The-Gutterfighting-Way&id=1474470
 
Training Your Grip: http://ezinearticles.com/?Training-Your-Grip&id=3356820
 
Attack the Attacker: Win a Violent Encounter from All Angles: http://ezinearticles.com/?Attack-the-Attacker—Win-a-Violent-Encounter-From-All-Angles&id=3379703
 
Combatives Technique: Chin Jab:  http://ezinearticles.com/?Combatives-Technique—Chin-Jab&id=3395169
 
Combatives Technique: Ax Hand: http://ezinearticles.com/?Combatives-Technique—Ax-Hand&id=3424015
 
Basic Awareness Exercises for Self-Protection: http://ezinearticles.com/?Basic-Awareness-Exercises-For-Self-Protection&id=3424933
 
We will be publishing more articles on eZine over time!